[info]lawchicky asked me for some cheese plate recommendations for Thanksgiving.

Since we don’t do a cheese plate for Thanksgiving, I don’t have photos of these cheese, but I do have many links. I tried to stick to cheese I see in normal grocery stores that have nice cheese sections, since I know that living in New York City, I can get some weird cheeses that aren’t available in many places in the US! You may not be able to get all of these, but you should be able to get some. I picked four cheeses from four categories each: soft cheese, semi-soft cheese, hard cheese, and blue cheese. If it’s not in the blue cheese category, it’s not a blue cheese! I tried to avoid ones that you’re already likely to have, like cheddar, gouda, and so forth.

Soft Cheeses
Camembert.
Robiola.
St. André.
St. Marcellin.

Semi-Soft Cheeses
Bel Paese.
Morbier.
Port Salut.
Taleggio.

Hard Cheeses
Caerphilly.
Gloucester.
Gruyere.
Manchego.

Blue Cheeses
Cashel.
Gorgonzola.
Maytag.
Stilton.

Here are also some more novelty-ish cheeses you might like, if you are into that:

Red Dragon (Y Fenni).
Winey Goat.
There are also a number of Wensleydale cheeses that are sold blended with fruits (cranberry or lemon, usually) that you might like if you like fruit and cheese.

A helpful note: Most hard cheeses are lactose-intolerant friendly. If you have a friend who is lactose-intolerant coming for Thanksgiving, make sure to include a traditionally-made hard cheddar, Asiago, Manchego, Emmental or other hard cheese on your cheese plate, as these cheeses are aged longer and contain a lot less lactose than softer cheeses. A lot of American name brand hard cheeses aren’t made this way, so check to see if the cheese has an age on it– cheeses that are aged for more than 2 years are usually good.

I hope this helps anyone who needs to do cheese shopping for Thanksgiving or upcoming winter holidays!